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The Black Dahlia Murder Tour

October 20 @ 6:30 pm - 11:30 pm

$24 - $48
The Black Dahlia Murder tour

The Black Dahlia Murder Tour, w/

  • Suffocation
  • Exhumed
  • Decrepit Birth
  • Necrot
  • Wormwitch

Doors open at 6:00 pm
Tickets = $24-$48

 

The Black Dahlia Murder

Black Dahlia MurderThis fall, The Black Dahlia Murder will embark upon a North American trek in support of their upcoming album, Nightbringers, due out October 6th via Metal Blade Records. The tour will run from October 6th through November 11th with a stop at this year’s edition of Ozzfest Meets Knotfest on November 5th. Support will be provided by Suffocation, Decrepit Birth, Necrot, Wormwitch, and Exhumed on select dates. The journey follows The Black Dahlia Murder’s co-headlining jaunt on The Summer Slaughter Tour with Dying Fetus, currently underway. Summer Slaughter sees The Black Dahlia Murder performing Nocturnal in its entirety in honor of the album’s ten-year anniversary. See below for remaining dates.

Rather than meticulously planning things out or sticking rigidly to any kind of template, when it comes to writing, The Black Dahlia Murder prefers to let things happen organically. In the hands of guitarist Brian Eschbach, who cofounded the band with frontman Trevor Strnad in 2001, and new recruit Brandon Ellis (Arsis, ex-Cannabis Corpse), Nightbringers is rich with dynamic riffs that are at once fresh and classic The Black Dahlia Murder, resulting in a collection that shifts through many moods and effortlessly incorporates various elements of extreme metal. While Strnad explores a variety of themes and ideas with his lyrics, they are united by the album’s title, which embraces a tenet that has been central to The Black Dahlia Murder‘s output since the very beginning. “Death metal and nighttime are synonymous to me,” Strnad explains. “We are the rulers of the darkened hours that the Christian good fears. A lot of archaic ideas that are still upheld – such as marriage and monogamy – came from Christianity, whether people want to acknowledge it or not, and to me, death metal has always been bucking that. It’s ‘being-the-villain music,’ because we’re the enemy of Christianity, the enemy of all that is good and traditional. Death metal is for free thinkers, it’s for showing people the path to inner strength and operating on your own will, instead of being told what to do and living in fear, and songs like the title track and ‘Kings Of The Nightworld’ are about leading a legion of awakened minds into battle.”

Suffocation

“Ever since I joined, Suffocation’s been on pretty heavy album and tour cycles,” bassist and lyric writer Derek Boyer agrees. “Sometimes the charisma was there, sometimes it wasn’t. We’d be on the road for a year, and only after that, we’d think about putting songs together. Then, we’d get pulled back on the road. That would delay the album cycle. So, our album cycle went from every two years to every three years to now every four years. Pinnacle of Bedlam came out in 2013. That’s a long time ago.”

Indeed, it was. When Pinnacle of Bedlam hit store shelves in the winter 2013, the world was proverbially on its knees. North Korea was conducting underground nuclear tests, a meteor hit a city in Russia’s South Urals, and Benedict XVI resigned as Pope, the first to intentionally do so since 1294. All this pandemonium occurred the same month Suffocation unfurled Pinnacle of Bedlam unto the world. Harbinger of doom it was. Four years later, the blue marble we inhabit is certifiably nuttier and more violent. It’s the perfect vehicle for Of the Dark Light, a full-length that not only welcomes new members—drummer Eric Morotti and guitarist Charlie Errigo—but also sees Hobbs writing the craziest, cruelest Suffocation material since Effigy of the Forgotten.

“A band like Suffocation isn’t going to introduce clean vocals or synthesizer,” says Boyer. “That’s just not who we are. This is Suffocation’s formula. This is the Suffocation fans have known to come and love. We’re not going to stray too far off that path. We have a focal point. We’re a death metal band. We’ve always been kind of quick and technical. We didn’t want to lose that. We just wanted to make all that more exciting, more alive on Of the Dark Light.”

“I wrote a lot about transcendence, leaving the physical body,” tells Boyer. “There are planes of existence you can’t go with the physical body. The only way to escape it is to end your life, not just of natural causes. There’s a suicidal theme to Of the Dark Light. But it’s not like we sit around thinking about or promoting suicide. No, we’re really talking about transcendence and what happens after.” Hobbs adds, “There are also a few songs on Of the Dark Light that are about loosely, I think, horror movie topics. We’re a death metal band. But the majority of the lyrics deal with transcending everything through death. Transcending our physical form. There’s touches of the Tibetan Book of the Dead to the lyrics. I mean, we prepare our whole lives to just pass away. What happens next? I don’t know, but I’m sure I’ll find out sooner or later.”

Exhumed

Decrepit Birth

Image may contain: plant and outdoorFor the better part of their 16-year existence, California-based death metallers Decrepit Birth haven’t followed the rules. From debut album, 2003’s …And Time Begins, to new album, Axis Mundi, they’ve shuffled the tried and true tenets of death metal into something defiantly other. Certainly, the Surf City denizens have written and continue to write—check out the pit-destroying ‘Transcendental Paradox’ off Axis Mundi—brutally brutal music, but after years of purveying labyrinthine riffs and blasts at light-suffering speeds, they’ve transcended, they’ve transformed, they’ve gone beyond. Decrepit Birth in 2017 aren’t entirely the same band that unfurled …And Time Begins in their twentysomethings.

“We’ve gone through an evolution throughout the years,” says founding member and primary songwriter Matt Sotelo. “The last couple of albums we had, Diminishing Between Worlds and Polarity, were more progressive death metal. They were different from …And Time Begins, which is a different genre of death metal. It’s more brutal. I’m the type of guy who likes to experiment. …And Time Begins has no solos. It’s all really fast palm-muted riffs. The other albums breathed more with the guitars. I let chords ring out on Diminishing Between Worlds and Polarity. Axis Mundi is combination of all the stuff I’m into. I like it a lot right now. It’s more melodic. The riffs repeat intentionally. I want to have fun with these songs.”

While most of Decrepit Birth’s peers aim lyrically and conceptually for the jugular—blood and guts are a never-ending font of inspiration—the Golden Staters have opted for the mystical and the arcane. Chief lyric writer and frontman Bill Robinson gets many of his ideas from literature and imbibing in mind-altering substances. For Axis Mundi, Robinson centered the lyrics on a theme. From opener ‘Vortex of Infinity – Axis Mundi’ through ‘Epigenetic Triplicity’ he’s taking the listener on a synodic journey, where portals to inner and outer spaces are opened for the intrepid.

Decrepit Birth are: Matt Sotelo (guitar), Bill Robinson (vocals), Samus Paulicelli (drums), and Sean Martinez (bass). With minds agape and riffs afire and invocations cast, they invite you to enter Axis Mundi!

 

Venue

The Forge
22 W. Cass St.
Joliet, IL 60432 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
(815) 280-5246
Website:
http://theforgelive.com/

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